Repairing A Failed P400 Raid Cache Battery

This was done on my HP P400 but the same method should work on a range of other cards with a similar setup such as the P212, P410 and probably many others from this era. As ever your mileage may vary!

Recently I was trying to copy one particularly large file across my network and realised the write speed on my server was dramatically reduced from what I would expect and the reported queue length in resource manager was regularly getting to 10 which seemed excessive. I was also seeing peak throughput to the 12 disk array of about 30 MB/s total.

I was copying the file off my desktop and this is where the weirdness started. I was sending from the desktop at 50MB/s which was slow but on investigation it checked out that that was correct for the drive it was coming from (though it did highlight I was still using one drive that was about 13 years old I should probably replace!). It would start fine and after a while I’d see the following:

Error 0x8007003B: An unexpected network error occurred

Error 0x8007003B: An unexpected network error occurred

I’m still not entirely sure what process is going on in the background here but what I saw was increasing ram usage (presumably at the 20MB/s difference between the sending and writing processes but I didn’t work it out). I assume at some point this buffer hits a limit and it fails. Whatever the exact process this is just a symptom of the fault elsewhere as indicated by having such an awful write speed on the array.

I started investigating the array by actually installing the HP array configuration utility (I probably should have done this ages ago but I actually configured the array through the BIOS utility originally) and on selecting the controller sure enough :

P400 Failed battery warning

Well that’s fairly definitive. So I decided to open it up and have a look at the damage. for the P400 the battery pack is on a long cable and is usually mounted to a bracket on the chassis next to the card. On the DL180 I have it installed into you have to remove three mounting screws and lift out the entire mounting frame and riser card section in one piece.

P400 card installed

Here you can see the HP P400 card (made by LSI but as far as I’m aware with no LSI branded equivalent). Piggybacked on the card is the 512MB cache card and coming out of the right end of it is the multi-coloured cable to the battery. This can be gently pulled out so the battery can be removed.

P400 position in DL180G6

The battery module as it was installed in my server, apparently someone had previously put it back in 180 degrees wrong but nevermind. Right away you can just about see the distortion in the casing caused by the battery failure.

P400 Cache Battery

A closer look at the battery pack shows how badly distorted the casing actually is indicating a total failure of the cells inside – not terribly surprising for a 13 year old battery! If you were doing this properly you’d just buy another one of this whole battery unit and replace it but I decided that for a raid card this old most second hand ones would likely be well used because I doubt they have produced new ones for a while so it’d be hit and miss anyway. Add to that the battery unit just uses four standard 1.2V NiMH cells (albeit uncommon shaped ones) I decided I could probably fix it with basic parts. The issue here was that I found this issue late on December 23rd so the challenge was to fix this with parts I could find locally before the Xmas break. Standby for the hackery…

I started trying to get into the pack on the basis it was ruined anyway. First off flip the pack over and unplug the cable from the battery pack. Technically this isn’t required nor is the board removal below but it makes it easier and takes the risk out when you’re working on the rest of it.

P400 Battery Cable connector
P400 Battery Cable connector removal

Removing the cable shows us the management board that handles charging status and health reporting to the card so we need to keep this. This is retained by a single clip in the recessed section on the left hand edge. Push the clip to the left and lift it, you may need to press it with a tool of some sort as it’s quite small and firm.

P400 Battery management PCB

Once unclipped as above the board can just be lifted out because the battery contacts are just sprung against the underside.

P400 Battery management PCB removed

Next up we need to try to get at the cells themselves. It’s a little hard to see but it turns out the underside is the ‘removable’ section of the case (as in the rest of it is a single moulded part) but mine was thin and brittle enough it just broke up as I tried to take it out but being the underside it’s not visible when reinstalled anyway.

P400 Battery enclosure cover removal

I used one of these iPod cover pry tools I had handy but since the cover broke up anyway a fine screwdriver would also do. Gently work round the cover prying it up but the cover is silicone-ed to the centre of the cells as well so just work on it – it comes of relatively easily.

P400 Battery cells exposed

Now we can see the cells for the first time. You can probably see the how the battery contacts for the PCB form part of the pack. Gently work round the pack cutting/levering the silicone apart then lift the cells out from the curved (non PCB) end of the housing to prevent damage to the contacts. Hopefully If should look like this:

P400 Battery cells removed

For anyone who wants to rebuilt their pack with the correct new cells they’re four Varta V500HT 1.2V/500mAh cells wired in series but you would have to find a good way to replace the cell links because they’re welded on. Also I could only find the cells on eBay where they were £7.50 each

So this is where my plan goes a bit more creative. I decided to just replace the the pack with some basic off the shelf NiMH cells so initially I tried to find a prebuilt pack of the right voltage. These are commonly available on eBay and several other places with a pair of wires coming out however as mentioned earlier this was now Xmas eve and so anything I ordered wouldn’t arrive for ages due to the break. I realised I had some AA NiMH cells which were also 1.2V so four of these would also be correct but I had no way of mounting them. After a brief search I found a local model shop who had suitable 4xAA holders in stock and I was the owner of this.

4xAA Battery  Case

Well worth a couple quid. Next we have to try to make this connect to the management PCB. Now if we were going totally hacky I’d have just soldered the two wires off the battery pack directly onto the contact pads on the back of the PCB and put a big bit of heat shrink over the board but that seemed a step too dodgy…however tempting it was! What I actually did was cut the board contact pads from the pack with a section of the metal from the cell side to allow a wire to be soldered on. The contact pad can them be slotted back into the original housing.

P400 Battery cell contacts reinstalled

In the picture above I slotted the PCB back in to check it made contact and to help hold the pads in place during soldering. Next I drilled a small hole into the rear of the housing to run the wires through from the other pack then soldered the wires on. The + and – are clearly marked on the housing and on the PCB so check this before soldering.

P400 Battery new pack connected

And I stuck a bit of hot glue on the contact points to stop them moving and a blob on the wire to keep it from straining the joints.

P400 Battery 3xAA complete

Now just put the AA’s in the case. If you have a battery case like this one, remember to flick the switch to ON!

Now you just plug the cable back into the PCB and install back into your computer. If you have the proper mount for it in your chassis it will just clip back in and not even be obvious the back has been removed. If you used a longer bit of black 2 core cable between the new pack and the old one you could make it even neater. Alternatively if you cut out the top of the housing you could probably fit a 2×2 AA housing sticking out through with the aid of some silicone but it’d still mount onto the standard bracket even if it would be pretty ugly. Take your pick!

P400 Battery with new 4xAA pack in the server

All done, now put the server back together and fire it up…

P400 Battery charging warning

Now on checking the HP Array configuration tool the message has changed to the above. I left it do its own devices and after a while this warning cleared. Once caching was enabled again the speed increase was dramatic. The write speed on the array for large files (>1Gb so larger than the cache) measured at 234 MB/s on the server Vs the 30 MB/s it was before. Smaller file writes which store to the cache are dramatically faster. On reattempting the large copy that kicked all this off it worked flawlessly first time. Monitoring resource manager on the server I could see that rather than a continuous write at 30 MB/s and high queue depths the write speed was periodically jumping much higher and waiting for more data in between, the queue depth was constantly at less than 1. I also didn’t see the increasing RAM usage I’d seen previously. It is also evident looking at the drive lights are mostly solid now with the occasional blink where they were constantly blinking.

Repairing a Hotpoint WT640 With The Flashing Display Fault

Note : This involved opening up mains powered equipment. This is dangerous and if you don’t understand and feel confident in what you’re doing don’t do it!

Due to the amount of sharing of components this may well apply to other Hotpoint models or even other brands (such as Whirlpool or Indesit) as they are all part of Whirlpool Group but this is the machine I had and did the repair on and beyond that don’t know. Anyway, back to the point…

So one day I went to my washing machine expecting it to have finished and it’d stopped mid way through a cycle and the LED display which shows the remaining time was flickering badly. I turned it off and on again and it worked and the screen came on as normal so initially I wrote it off as just a blip and carried on my day. Unfortunately a few days later I turned it on and the problem had come back and this time I couldn’t get the machine to run a cycle and powering off didn’t help.

Knowing there’s not much going on inside a washing machine from a technical point of view and also knowing that flicking/buzzing on equipment is often caused by a capacitor failing I decided I’d have a quick look and see if I could find any of the tell-tale signs of capacitor failure anywhere.

Before you do anything unplug the machine!

The main PCB for this machine is located to the rear of the machine behind a hatch and once you can get at the back of the machine is really easy to remove.

WT640 rear access hatch

First off remove the white hatch on the rear of the unit as shown in the photo, this will require a crosshead screwdriver.

WT640 Main PCB location

Looking through the uncovered hatch you will now see the PCB to the left hand side with a number of connectors installed in it and the wiring held in place by clips. Gently release the wire from the clips so it is free to move. I suggest taking photos of how it is all laid out so it’s easy to put it back later. Next remove the screws in the rear panel that retain the PCB housing (highlighted in red below). You may also still have a cover over the diagnostic port (location marked in green) and if you pop this off as well.

WT640 PCB housing mounting screws

At this point you should be able to lift the PCB out of the hatch. The wiring is still connected currently but should have enough slack to allow this.

WT640 Wiring positions

Now gently pull off all the the connectors and you can remove the whole board from the unit. This is the bit where many maintenance/service places will just plug a new board in and call it a day but that costs quite a bit of money and not the sort of thing I do given half a chance!

WT640 Main PCB removed from machine

Next there are a series of clips around the plastic housing that we need to undo separate the housing and look inside. You should be able to release these by just squeezing the lower section of the housing but if not slip a fine bladed screwdriver between the sections of the housing and pop them apart. The position of the clips it pretty obvious because there are matching cutouts in the plastic. The image shows one side but they continue round the casing.

WT640 PCB cover clips

With any luck you should be looking at something like this:

WT640 Main PCB Open

Now there’s not a lot of parts on here but a very brief search leads us to the small group of capacitors in the centre. Specifically the parts marked on the PCB as C17 and C20.

Capacitor failure signs on C17 and C20

Looking at these capacitors it’s pretty easy to see both the 680uF (C17) and 470uF (C20) have swelled out end caps which is indicative of failure so that’s a strong indication this is a problem and while there’s no guarantee it’s the cause of the specific problem we are having it’s a pretty strong possibility! For the sake of a couple capacitors it’s well worth replacing them regardless and seeing what happens – so that’s what I did.

The pads to desolder for C17 and C20

I’m the image above I’ve marked the pads that need de-soldering to remove these capacitors just to make life a bit easier. You can probably see that I’ve put red sharpie on them in the image as well – this is something I often do to make sure I don’t try to desolder the wrong part.

C17 and C20 Capacitors removed from the PCB

So now the dodgy capacitors are gone, check the markings on yours and order some replacements. Mine were both 10V rated electrolytic parts rated at 680uF for C17 and 470uF for C20. When ordering capacitors the voltage isn’t critical as long as you’re buying ones with a voltage either equal to or above the required voltage so in this case you could use 16V or even 25V parts if they’re easier to get. I recommend buying a higher temperature type (generally 105°C parts are widely available and will make the component last longer) additionally low-ESR parts have less of an internal heating effect and so if you can get these do so and they should last even longer, particularly in warm environments. You could just do like for like replacement but I’m a fan of doing a bit more to only do a job once and not have to fix it again later. Particularly when the parts are so cheap! Make particular note of the polarity of the new capacitors when you install them, the polarity marks should be the same way round as the old ones.

New C17 and C20 capacitors installed

The new capacitors are installed. Now in classic Haynes manual style “reassembly is the reverse of disassembly”. Once I’d stuck everything back together I put the power on and the blinking was gone.

Good luck, as ever your mileage may vary!

Update : Two years later it’s still working perfectly.

RX8 Project – Part 18, Resurfacing Cylinder Heads the Cheap Way!

As ever do this at your own risk. For most people you’re better off just getting heads machined by a specialist but if you’re reading this blog you’re probably already aware that’s not always the way I do it!

So this idea came from me wondering how I could easily clean up the cylinder heads on the V6 without additional machining. The heads were generally in good condition so I just wanted a fresh surface for the new head gaskets to seal well on rather than trying to remove any surface damage or warping. If you have this sort of damage this method is not for you.

When I came up against this problem I decided to do some research and found quite a few people online saying you could just do it with suitable abrasive paper and a sanding block. Now I get the idea but the engineer in me sees a good possibility of some part getting ground back more than another actually increasing the issues with the head that we’re trying to remove in the first place. Around this time I spoke with a few different people who have experience with engines and they all said much the same thing – machine skimming is safest and easiest but with enough care it should be possible to do a perfectly good job by hand, the problem is getting the whole thing completely flat which is very difficult by hand. Most people who had done this seemed to have done it on engines with small cylinder heads such as single cylinder machine engines which being small are easier to get flat by hand.

The problem was absolutely one of getting something suitably flat that would cover the whole head to get the whole thing even so I started looking into what might work. I was already aware of engineers surface tables which are used for checking flatness but these are large, heavy and very expensive as they’re often made of stone or tool steel. I then looked at getting some surface ground steel plate (where a thick steel place is ground to a precision flatness) but again this seemed to be expensive and awkward. After a bit of thought I had an idea…

£4 eBay coffee table


Ok, so at first glance this seems like a daft idea but stick with me! The cheapest and most rigid precisely flat surface I could find was a piece of toughened float glass. Specifically toughened because it is created in such as way as to pre-stress the surface which makes it both stronger and stiffer but also much more brittle – this is the glass that breaks down into granules when broken rather than shards. Initially my plan was to just order a decent sized bit but that seemed rather wasteful so I thought about it and realised second hand furniture included quite sizeable bits of the glass. I began searching eBay and Facebook marketplace to see if I could find something suitable as cheaply as possible and after a week or so found this coffee table. It was nearby and listed as local collection only with some damage to the wood veneer and scratches on top surface of the glass (so the price was unlikely to go high) and 99p no reserve starting. Couple days later I was the proud owner of a £4 coffee table!

Now you may be wondering why we aren’t bothered about the surface scratches on the glass which is likely to be a problem with any similar furniture. The reason is twofold, firstly due to this being toughened glass any scratches are likely to only be very minor and secondly the glass has a whole other side which is unlikely to have any scratches anyway so we’re going to use the underside.

I took the table apart carefully removing the top and to give additional support I placed it flat on a 19mm (3/4″) thick bit of chip board carefully screwing an section of baton at each end to stop the glass sliding about while we’re working. This assembly when then placed on my carpet which is just very hard office carpet tiles on concrete so shouldn’t allow any appreciable movement so hopefully with that stack of support the glass should be perfectly flat even with a cylinder head on it! The abrasive I will be using is wet and dry paper in a range of coarseness, get a pack of each grade you plan to use, it will take a lot of it! I made sure the wet and dry would stay in place by spraying the back of it with spray mount adhesive and putting it in place. Spray mount should also peel off relatively easily when we need to change the paper. I used 3 sheets to create an area larger than the head face in both length and width.

Glass coffee table refinishing rig


So now we have our setup we need to prepare the cylinder head for this. When it came off the engine it was quite grimy as you might expect so this needed addressing.

Head with worst of gasket scraped off


So here you can see how it was when it was (almost) fresh off the engine but with the residual head gasket material scraped off. You can see the amount of grime isn’t too bad, I have already wiped some off the top half but the bottom is a bit more representative. You can also clearly see the outline marks from the head gasket that we’re looking to remove later. This step basically involved soaking the mating face in a de-greaser then wiping it all off carefully.

Head during degreasing
Head after degreasing but before refinishing


It’s not perfect but it’s a huge improvement on where we started. The combustion chambers are considerably better. There’s some residual on the face but its more staining than anything else and will be removed by the refacing. So now we’re ready to go.

First cover the wet and dry with your chosen lubricant – water should work but I found WD40 seemed to work better as it helped the head ‘glide’ more. A light oil like 3in1 would probably be even better as it’s a little thicker again and WD40 tends to dissolve the spray adhesive as you work making the wet&dry come loose. Take the head and place it on the wet and dry (I started at 120 grit) holding both sides lightly start to slide it across the surface. There are different approaches to this where you can angle the head first one way then the other to give a crosshatch pattern. In my case I generally moved it in a long oval and this seemed to give a nice even finish but as ever your mileage may vary!

Cylinder head sat on DIY refinishing setup

You will find that as you work the oil and metal shavings will spread so I suggest doing it somewhere you don’t mind the mess!

This will take some time and effort. If the wet and dry wears down replace it. when you’re happy with the initial surface being clean of all the minor marks and debris you can go up to increasingly fine levels of grit for a better finish.

On the subject of finishes when I was doing this work I found the following information which relates the abrasive rating with the achieved resulting surface roughness – if anyone knows where this is from please let me know as I can’t seem to find out.

US GritUK Grit Ra µmRa µinch
 P1203125
 P180285
80 1.6570
 P2401.550
 P3200.7530
180 0.6225
240 0.4518
 P5000.415
320 0.2510
Comparison of grits vs achieved surface finish

So in the context of this I’m working in UK grit. Unfortunately the only information I could find on the required surface finishes for head gaskets came from the US so is in Ra µinch (Ra being the roughness average of the surface) but luckily this table equates everything. Generally normal gaskets seem to need a surface finish of about 50-60 Ra µinch, modern multi layer steel head gaskets require 30 Ra µinch or smoother so we need to finish at a minimum of P320. I actually went up to P400 to be safe.

Comparison between not touched and work in progress cylinder head


This is the comparison of the untouched head and the one with the first couple of grits done and so not quite finished but you can see the massive improvement made here.

Head surface reflection

I know judging by eye isn’t accurate but it’s clearly doing something good!

Keep going until you do all the grits you need and when you’re done then you need to check the flatness. I did this with an engineers straight edge (as opposed to a builders straight edge which is a big ruler) which cost £25 off ebay. This is a bit of steel that has been precision ground to be completely straight in one plane so is often only a couple mm thick but 70mm wide or more. You check the flatness by putting the straight edge perpendicular to the head (so it sticks up) and trying to slide a feeler gauge under the mid point (or as close as possible) of the area you’re checking. You need to check the width, length and both diagonals but also check across all the bores. The head should have no more than 0.075 mm off flat over the longest span on an iron head, or 0.05 mm off flat on an aluminium head on a V6. In my case the smallest feeler I have is 0.04mm so that proved it was good enough but to check it further I got some thin foil, checked the thickness with a digital micrometer which came out as 0.01mm and placed the foil on one of the central bridges of the head and put the straight edge on and it rocked on the foil. I then redid the test with the foil at the ends and the same again in other directions. Each time the straight edge was clearly resting on the foil first so the head must be flat to <0.01mm across the whole head. Unfortunately I neglected to take any photos of this stage but there’s plenty of information online.

That’s about as good as it gets so our £4 coffee table looks like a success. Plus I still own a coffee table – albeit with a few new scratches!

RX8 Project – Part 17, Changing to a concentric clutch slave.

To preface this I’ve not actually run the car with this setup yet so please make your own decision if you give it a go. This was done on the gearbox from a 2006 year RX8 5 speed box so may not be applicable to others. It looks like it should work but that’s only my opinion – your mileage may vary!

So this is a bit of an odd problem which depending on the engine you’re swapping in may not be and issue but in my case I decided a V6 was a good idea and unfortunately the standard clutch slave on the RX8 gearbox is on the top offset to one side which lines up perfectly with one of the cylinder heads on my V6. Add to this if you made the better decision mentioned earlier and made the adapter thicker you may be able to avoid this as well. But since I’m largely making this up as I go along here we are!

Now I did look into whether anyone offered a concentric slave conversion for this car but it seems that was never a thing anyone did so I set to work building my own. Luckily there was one thing I knew which would help this process quite a bit – the input shaft on the gearbox is the same diameter/spline as most Ford patterns and so a Ford part should be exactly the right clearance. Add to that I’m actually using a Ford clutch if I get the depth right everything should just match up ok.

So that’s the good news, the bad news is the RX8 gearbox was never intended to be used in this way so mounting a cylinder could be an issue. Now on the RX8 there’s a flanged sleeve mounted which the original release bearing slides on the outside of. This is held on by four bolts into the back of the bellhousing and so this appeared to be essentially the only option. The tube itself can’t stay because the new concentric slave is the same ID and so clashes with it but I thought why don’t I just unbolt the tube at the flange and bolt a suitable adapter there and we’re good to go? Well it’s never that easy is it. Under that flange is a location lip which not only keeps it concentric to the gearbox input shaft but it turns out it also the height of the shoulder accurately holds the input bearing in place behind it so if I just remove that whole part the bearing will move out of position and that will very likely result in it not having enough support and rapidly removing itself from the gearbox in small pieces.

3D model of the RX8 gearbox input bearing retainer
Unfortunately I can’t find a photo of it but the part looked like this!

Ok so I can’t just remove the flanged tube and stick an adapter plate on but how about cutting the tube down to the flange to leave a flat face above the bearing retainer and just using some longer bolts to keep it all in place. After some very careful trimming I was left with this:

Modified RX8 bearing retainer

Next was picking a suitable concentric slave from the Ford range. After a bit of poking about and trying to find something I could make fit I found the Teckmarx TMCS00047 which is a 3rd party part number for a 2001-2007 Mk3 Mondeo/Cougar among others which as you might have read earlier was also available with this same V6 engine I am using and this model has a few advantages firstly that both in and out hydraulics are in one direction so if I make that line up with the original position of the clutch fork I should have easy access and also that they’re threaded the standard M10x1 brake fitting thread so I can direct connect hoses or hardline as I need to make it work. another major advantage is they’re used on loads of versions of the car so they’re widely available and very cheap at under £25 delivered. It also seems that the RX8 also has almost same clutch master cylinder bore as the Mondeo (18mm vs 19mm) which should mean pedal travel is still sensible.

Mondeo mk3 concentric clutch slave

3D model of Mk3 Mondeo Clutch slave

Now with the clutch slave accurately 3D modelled I could measure the 4 bolt flange from the gearbox bearing retainer and by overlaying the two bolt patterns aligned on the centre of the input shaft I could design an adapter which I could index the relative rotational angle of the bolt patterns in the software until the fluid connections where in the right place for the hole in the bellhousing. The resulting first version was this :

3D design of first adapter design

Initially I transferred this to a bit of scrap plastic to make sure I hadn’t made any stupid mistakes before spending much more time cutting a proper steel adapter plate.

Plastic prototype RX8 clutch slave adapter

So with all that checked out and nothing apparently an issue I moved onto the steel one. I did make a mistake here if you can spot it…

To make the adapter I did the same as I had done with the plastic where I printed out the design at 100% scale, stuck it to the steel and then used a centre punch to mark the centre of all the drill positions. I admit this isn’t the most accurate method but it seems to work quite well!

Clutch slave adapter Mk1 in steel

This is the initial adapter, the four larger holes are M8 clearance holes. on the original RX8 flanged retainer they’re 9.4mm but I think I did them 8.5mm as that’s the drill I had available and tightening up the tolerance was probably a good thing. This actually turned out to be less of a problem in the end but that’s another story. The centre hole is larger than the original design to allow for the location feature I’d overlooked on the new slave (which is 42mm OD) to sit within it.

Clutch slave adapter trial fitted to the gearbox

So it fits, I called this good progress but it should come as absolute no surprise that it wasn’t quite that simple…

Clutch slave unit fitted to adapter plate

As soon as I tried to add the clutch slave all the issues become apparent as it just clashed with everything. This told me that I’d need to change the adapter to countersunk bolts so the slave didn’t foul them. I could have changed the rotation but I wanted to avoid having lengths of pipe in the bell housing if I could. Plus I’d already made this steel adapter and didn’t want to do it again!

The other thing I noticed is that the cast webs off the original pivot point actually clashed with the adapter plate preventing it from quite sitting flat so I decided to remove some of the plate to correct this minor issue.

Now the adapter sits flat and at the same time I countersunk all the adapter bolt holes and replaced the bolts.

It all fits more or less where I wanted it but when I tried to bolt up the gearbox I saw another problem. With the bearing retainer plate, a sensible thickness for an adapter plate and the height of the concentric slave itself the slave was already almost fully pressed down so that which it may have worked initially as the clutch wore the slave would prevent the clutch from fully re-engaging. Clearly not ideal so we need to get more radical. First off the back of the clutch slave had a lip similar to the one on the RX8 flanged plate which initially I was just going to leave on and sit on top of the bearing retainer plate as it was slightly thicker than the adapter plate but that just wasn’t an option any more. Below you can the way the slave is totally compressed. Also note how close the hydraulic connection point is to the original pivot point casting.

Stack height issues in the new clutch assembly

This lip was adding a couple mm of stack height we needed to remove so I proceeded to carefully file the lip off down on the slave such that it would sit full within the adapter plate and ideally totally flush to the back of the plate.

On trying to refit this in its new position I realised I’d created another problem that I glossed over earlier – that I’d need to remove some of the original gearbox casting to make the new slave sit flat in the orientation I needed as the original clutch fork pivot point clashed with the location where I wanted the hydraulic connections on the new slave. The best method I found was a drill bit larger than the feature and just drill the top of it away until it clears the new slave.

Around this time I realised really I needed to remove the original flanged bearing retainer plate as it alone added about 4mm to the stack height so I engaged in the type of butchery that makes engineers wince. I took the flanged retainer and trimmed the flange off it. Yes I specifically mean that – if you cut through the bearing retainer ring it will reduce the height such that the bearing is no longer held tightly so you need to carefully trim off just the flange plate leaving a ring the right height fill the gap between the bearing and where the retaining plate face would be. because the new slave retaining face was now flush with the adapter plate this ring will now be held in place by that. Removing this plate now meant I had to drill yet more out of the pivot casting to prevent it clashing but that’s easy.

Final fitment of the concentric slave conversion from the original fork position

Now everything is in place and the hydraulics are accessible through the original clutch fork hole.

RX8 gearbox refitted to the car

And all back in the car…

For anyone who may want it here’s the PDF drawing for the adapter :

Getting John the Ripper working in OpenCL mode in Windows

I recently needed to recover passwords from a Linux system where I had the drive which I could connect to a Windows PC but this presented several issues starting with finding the right file then what tools to use and most importantly how to mate it correctly in OpenCL mode to get the benefit of graphics card processing power!

Firstly the drive was formatted as EXT3 which Windows doesn’t natively support. After a bit of research I found a free program called Ext Volume Manager and gave it a go. It worked perfectly and after giving a list of available drives you can double click and mount the drive as a drive letter in Windows then just browse to it like any other drive. It was simple and worked really well.

Now that problem out the way we needed to find the password file. In Linux passwords were historically stored in a hashed form in root/etc/ in a file named passwd so this is the first place to look. Open it in notepad or similar and it is highly likely you will see a series of lines line this:

root:x:0:0:root:/root:/bin/bash

The X is where the hash would have been found historically but when the security was updated this method was changed and so the X just shows that there is a password configured but it’s stored elsewhere.

That elsewhere is a file in the same location called ‘shadow’. The structure of this file is very similar to ‘passwd’ but in Linux has different permissions. Luckily in windows this doesn’t make much difference so we can just open it.

root:$6$THMmaDC5$k/fXJE/K73OSr3KuXBs.TzBjX6i3kj1dEwrEuV7DvsTxQ0YBDceTpHVQRKSPRTqhMFbdZfZl/lZVfnMCrkFJX1:15726:0:99999:7:::

The data should look more like this (I have cropped out some of the line to avoid it filling the screen. The $6$ in this case identifies the password hash as being sha512crypt format but yours may differ, the options are:

  • $1 = MD5 hashing algorithm.
  •  $2 =Blowfish Algorithm is in use.
  •  $2a=eksblowfish Algorithm
  •  $5 =SHA-256 Algorithm
  •  $6 =SHA-512 Algorithm

The next bit ‘ THMmaDC5 ‘ is the ‘salt’ value which is random data used to encode the password as the hash making it more difficult to guess.

The remainder up to the colon is the hashed password which is what needs to be guessed so now we have the right file.

Next go ahead and download Cygwin ( https://www.cygwin.com/ ) this is basically a miniature Linux platform on Windows which lets you compile Linux programs to run under Windows if they are compiled for it.

When installing Cygwin generally you can just use defaults and whatever local mirror you fancy however when the list of tools is shown search for OpenCL and add this to the installation.

OpenCL Version

Add the highlighted component to the install and continue and you should find you will soon have a Linux installation in a folder on your PC (default location is C:\cygwin64\ ).

Next download the zip of latest version of John the Ripper ( https://www.openwall.com/john/ ) – this is a widely recognised tool for this purpose and seems to work best. I also tried a program called HashCat but this didn’t seem to be able to find the hashes in the file. The version I used was 1.9.0-jumbo-1-64 Bit.

Hopefully the zip will look like this. Copy the all the folders and paste them into the Cygwin folder – there will already be a folders with those names so merge them. This operation adds the descriptors to allow Cygwin to recognise your OpenCL device however on my PC (and from what I’ve been reading online several others the path was incorrect so we’ll fix that.

Browse to the following path C:\cygwin64\etc\OpenCL\vendors\ and open the amd.icd file in notepad.

Next go the the system32 folder as shown and search for ‘amdocl64.dll’ . In my case this wasn’t present in the system32 folder directly but I found a match in System32\DriverStore\FileRepository\ . If that is what you find just copy the file and paste it into system32 itself and this should correct the mismatch.

Next copy your ‘shadow’ file into ‘C:\cygwin64\run’ – technically this isn’t required but it makes life easier. In my case I edited it to have a .txt extension to make testing easier. Now to test it!

Open a command prompt Window and browse to ‘C:\cygwin64\run’ then enter the following command:

john shadow.txt –format=sha512crypt-opencl

Interchanging the format for whatever is relevant to your hash type. If you run john without specifying a hash format it will recognise it correctly but will default to CPU only mode rather than the OpenCL version which comes with a performance hit for most people.

All going well you should see something like this :

That tells us its working fine and has successfully found the graphics card as a processing device. Now take a break and leave it to churn through its options for as long as it takes. It won’t be fast!

Start of 2020 Update

Apologies to anyone who’s been waiting for an update on any of the projects I’ve put on here – I’ve had a lot going on over the last year and writing up all of this information takes me a lot of time so has taken a bit of a back seat. None of that information has been lost and I hope to start catching up on all of this over the next few months.

Where we are right now :

V6 Mazda RX8

The V6 engine has been fully rebuilt and has been sat in my living room next to an engine crane for about 8 months now, Partly this is due to me not currently having a garage to work in and it being winter and partly due to being very busy last summer. But yes, the project is still ongoing and hopefully will make good progress this year.

Six million dollar welder

Is still on my workbench awaiting the last couple of bits. I’ve had to swap out 24V PSU’s a couple times as they couldn’t deal with the current of the new feed motor. It now works but needs the relays mounted to the panel so I need to remember to find 4″ of DIN rail.

DL180 Server

Is still working beautifully after the Arduino fan controller mod. It’s been hosting this blog ever since so something like 12 months now without a problem. It also provides the storage for my CCTV system.

Hikvision CCTV

I’ve got a couple of updates to write about expanding the system beyond the original one camera setup I wrote up last year. Using multiple cameras with network storage seems to be poorly documented and have a few interesting quirks but after some work I got it working fine. The biggest problem I’ve had since is when the local police asked for my footage following a nearby break-in I had to supply them on a 1 Tb hard drive! High resolution digital video takes up a lot of space!

Other Projects

I’ve had various other projects going on as well. I’ve started looking into using NodeMCU WiFi microcontrollers as sensor nodes with their own web servers around my house with NodeRed requesting the page and parsing the HTML to return the information I want. I can read the temperature sensor connected to the nodes and control the LED on the MCU from NodeRed. Currently the data is not stored because I ran out of time trying to get MySQL setup. I’ll write this all up at some point

Raspberry Pi’s – I seem to have collected a selection of Raspberry Pi’s somewhere along the way. I have a Zero, a ZeroW, 1B (which in a different life I turned into a PoE CCTV camera), 2B and 3B plus I think somewhere there’s another 2B. I really should do something cool with them!

Wooden storage box – I started restoring a large wooden box some time ago. The box used to be in my granddad’s workshop as a toolbox for many years and before that I gather it belonged to his uncle so it’s been around for a long time and has suffered a bit with use and age with some areas with woodworm damage and the rope handles badly degraded. It has also been painted brown at some stage so I’ll need to get that cleaned up as well. I intend to restore it to a ‘usable’ condition so rather than trying to make it as new just tidy it up, repair the damage and make it solid enough not to degrade further but still look like the well used item it is.

Subwoofer project – Has been in constant use for ages despite never being technically finished. I really need to actually finish it and write this up!

There will be more but I think that’s enough update for now – rest assured I’ve not stopped! Especially since this morning another turbo arrived in the post, the fourth I now have here….

Upgrading a SIP Migmate 130 Turbo welder – Part 2, The 6m Dollar Welder

So after it had been left abandoned in a cupboard for a couple years I was recently contacted by the guy who actually owns the old SIP Migmate welder saying he had a couple projects to do that would be good for a MIG but aware we’d previously done it serious damage to the torch he’d found a wire feed unit with a euro torch connector on ebay and could we make it fit. Well of course we could, what could possibly go wrong! Before I knew it he’d ordered it to ship to me so I guess we were modding the welder again. We can rebuild it better than it was before!

Upgraded Wire Feed

Wire feeder
The new wire feed motor

So this is what turned up – clearly a different beast entirely to the original plastic rubbish. Don’t be mistaken, it’s a top quality Chinese unit but it is significantly better built than the original – one being mostly metal it doesn’t deflect under load. Add to that the motor is rated at 40W which is probably four times more than the original one it should be able to drive wire through longer torch leads with no problem.

Wire feed drive comparison

You can clearly see the significant difference in the units in this picture. But that isn’t going to stop us!

First off we need to remove the existing feed unit. These are held on with four pop rivets which are quickest removed with a power drill. To extract the drive unit the torch must also be unbolted from it with the one retaining nut.

Migmate 130 of feed removal

So at this point you should be left with this :

At this stage you’re probably wondering how this will work, and if (however unlikely) you’re attached to this welder you probably want to stop reading, this will not be pretty!

If you’re you’re not attached to the welder I suggest finding an angle grinder and getting busy!

The key thing to note here is because the new drive is for a euro torch it is energised by the main supply so no conductive part of the feed drive can be in contact with the casing. Add to this the new unit has an adjustment on the top which needs clearance under the case the feed motor cut out needs to continue much lower down.

Due to the feed mechanism being physically wider the connector for the euro torch connector will sit further out than the original torch outlet. In an ideal world I’d have relocated the the wire feed to the bottom of the welder but the outlet inductor is behind the panel and I didn’t want to go trying to move that enough for that idea to be viable.

First cut for wire feed

The first cut doesn’t look too serious, then hack the front out :

Front first cut

Hmm, yes I’ll work out how to cover that up later!

Next up we make a plate to hold the euro connector. This is to prevent any movement on the euro connector causing it to hit the case which could end very badly. I found a random bit of polycarbonate I had lying about drilled a clearance hole in it then worked out where it needed to sit. The horizontal position here is less critical as we can adjust it on the mounting later. The plate needs mounting holes to fix it to the front plate so drill and bolt this. A trial fit then also identified that when the new feeder was fully forward in position more clearance was required in the internal plate so this needed a little more butchery.

New mounting for replacement wire feeder

The blue wire dangled through the divider in the picture is actually the trigger wire for the welder something we’ll need to sort out later to actually make it work.

Wire feeder trial fit

So here’s the trial fit, nothing touching the case where it shouldn’t and all seeming to fit well. around this time I wanted to get a matching torch for the upgraded welder so I went to my favourite welding shop (Noz-Alls in Cheltenham) to pick one up and while there I explained what I was up to with the welder and he helped me out with some more bits he had. Specifically I wanted to upgrade the welder from using 0.7kg wire spools to 5kg spools so I needed a new mount for the reel and not only did he have something he also mentioned that I’d suitable gas valve (the welder originally had a mechanical one in the torch but I hadn’t even thought about the fact euro torches don’t have this. Again he had just the thing available for a few pounds so I got that as well.

New feed roller

Now that looks more like a proper setup, this new mount just bolts through the divider plate. Next up we need to mount the drive motor itself, it is critical to remember the black plate under the drive must remain to insulate it from the mounting bracket. I originally intended to mount it with a section of angle but in the end I came up with another alternative. I had a short offcut of 40x40mm aluminium profile with a couple angle fixings which by luck was perfectly sized so I decided to use that up.

Mounted new wire feeder

Something I should probably note here is using either durloc or nyloc nuts on everything I can and make sure everything is good and tight. The owner of this welder can be hard on equipment and I want to be sure that when I hand it back it won’t just fall apart!

Fully fitted wire feed and reel holder

That’s the wire feed and 5 kg reel setup all installed. So now back to the problem I mentioned earlier with the gas valve. The black hose coming off the back of the euro connector is the gas line, I need to connect this to a valve. I decided to mount the valve on the electrical side of the welder because my plan was to drill out the original hole the gas hose entered through to take a more standard 3/8″ BSP threaded fitting.

Gas Valve

New gas valve

The valve I bought is a direct fit to the 5mm ID hose off the euro connector. The valve inlet is an 8mm barb so I bought an 8mm to 3/8″ BSP female hose barb and screwed it into the back of an 3/8″ BSP bulkhead fitting. The bit of hose is a section of 8mm fuel hose I had lying about. The valve actually has a nut on one side to allow it to be mounted to a panel, in this case I mounted it to a section of aluminium angle. These valve are available in a range of voltages; usually 6/12/24VDC in welders but others are available. Since the feed motor is 24 VDC and we need this to open when the feed is on it makes sense to use the same then we only need one trigger switched supply for both.

Earth lead

So with the addition of a detachable torch I thought a detachable earth lead might be a good idea. I bought a 10-25 dinse connector off ebay, this comes as a plug and socket pair where the socket fits through a hole in the panel and the plug is bolted onto the end of the cable. To mount the socket I undid the clamp inside the welder where the cable was fixed to the supply transformer. The cable is held in by a plastic clamp so just undo that and pull the cable clear and remove the clamp from the panel. As it turns out the panel hole was fitted with a dinse connector in a different model and so they actually fit the panel perfectly with the anti-rotation key even fitting. Again for the power connection to the socket I used a 10mm re-usable cable lug but had to fold the solid core from the transformer back on itself so the clamp would tighten onto it solidly.

Dinse connector
Make sure it’s all tight; you don’t want this coming loose!

Wire Feed Controller

I decided in the end rather than bothering to improve the existing speed controller which is well documented to have issues I’d simply replace it with a modern PWM DC motor controller. PWM controllers generally allow a very wide range of adjustment and because they apply full voltage the motor retains excellent torque even at low speeds. So I bought another quality Chinese board off ebay and after a couple weeks I had one of these:

These go for about £2.50 and from my initial tests with a 19 VDC laptop supply and the new 40W motor it worked perfectly and it gave very smooth control up through the full range. The only thing that might need adjustment later is that full speed seems excessively fast for a welder but this is something to assess when the motor is loaded. With the smoothness of the range this wouldn’t be a problem but if we don’t need it later it would be better to add a resistor to make the controller only go up say 75% full speed when the dial is at maximum. But we’ll worry about that later.

The next problem is the nut on the potentiometer which would normally hold it in place fits right through the original hole in the panel. So I found a large penny washer which it would tighten up on and drilled two holes in it. This washer was then pop riveted to the front panel. With the knob back on you cant even see the rivets.

New motor controller
Rear view of the new controller
And the front view – you can see the other additions as well

Now, you may notice I’ve taken out the original PCB. This is partly because we needed the spot for the new speed controller but also because that makes about half the PCB redundant. The only other things on the PCB are a small 12V PSU (to drive the main supply relay), a couple line filter capacitors and a 16A relay which switches the main supply. My plan is to replace the relay with a 24V coil one and run all the control off the separate 24 VDC supply.

More to follow in the next update!

Upgrading a SIP Migmate 130 Turbo welder

The story of this upgrade starts with a friend of mine acquiring it about 15 years ago (at which point it was already quite old) and after some use real life got in the way and it was abandoned in a barn for about a decade. At this point I needed a welder for a project and asked to borrow it. Now when I got my hands on it and started trying to use it it became immediately obvious these welders were amazingly basic and poorly constructed and so immediately I started modifying it to make it work a little better.

Factory Wire Feed

First off the standard wire feed is terrible, it’s made of plastic and if you put enough pressure on to push the wire the mounting for the drive (being plastic) actually bends away and just won’t consistently grip. This situation can be improved by changing the plastic torch liner out for a steel one to reduce friction but it’s still dodgy. Bracing the wire feed on the outside helps as well.

Migmate 130 Feed Mod

Here you can see the feed modification. It is simply a bit of scrap metal with a slight bend in it and two holes. The two screws are already in the feed system and hold the parts from the factory so it just picks up on them. This simple mod helps the two feed rollers from deflecting away from each other.

The next issue with the wire feed is the motor is driven off the main transformer output with half wave rectified DC which causes a one main problem, the supply to it isn’t consistent. When the arc is struck the voltage at the motor will drop due to the load change on the transformer which tends to make the motor constantly pulse in operation rather than give a consistent feed so it’ll join metal but not in a particularly convincing way.

To get round this I added a small regulated 24VDC supply for the motor with the help of information I found on the internet such as the wiring diagram for the welder. The was this works is the control board gets its 24V supply from the black wire on the 4 pin connector. If we disconnect this and instead feed it our own 24VDC the supply shouldn’t fluctuate any more. I used the existing supply (the black wire we just intercepted) via a relay (24VAC coil) to turn on the wire feed when the output energises. You should end up with something like this

I’ve not checked the rating on the factory feed motor but I would guess 10W at most. I used a 24VDC 15W PSU module (specifically a Tracopower 15124C that I found on ebay) and it worked well. I managed to fit it behind the main transformer bolted to the outer casing.

Added power supply location

Further to this the motor speed circuit is actually very poorly designed and after a little use can get twitchy and change during use. I didn’t get as far as modifying this but further information can be found here :

Wire speed mod

Or if that should ever go offline also in this PDF :

Earth Lead

Another key usability thing is that these welders have very short leads and the clamp was poor from new and appeared to be a similar thickness to tinfoil and added to that was badly damaged and even rusty and since poor contact causes many issues with consistent welding so I decided to upgrade the cable and clamp to help the situation. For a welder this size you need to be looking at a minimum of 10mm2 cable but this will not allow you to operate at full power consistently (not that this welder is actually capable of that anyway!) 16mm2 would give you plenty of spare capacity.

The clamp itself was just bought off ebay again, they’re about £4 each so difficult to go far wrong. You could go for a different style to the normal clamp if you prefer such as a magnetic one. To connect the cable to the stud on the clamp I used a reusable cable lug which uses two small bolts to tighten to the cable, you could buy crimp lugs but crimping them without the correct tools can be hit and miss. I’ve heard a cold chisel will work but your mileage may vary. I actually used a second reusable cable lug to clamp the new cable onto the transformer outlet inside the welder – not the neatest solution but it worked.

Gas Supply

The standard shielding gas supply on these welders is via a small plastic tube which is intended to be connected to a mini-bottle which sits in two brackets on the back. The brackets aren’t actually fixed to the welder so can be easily knocked off. The standard regulator is rubbish and the one I got with the welder was totally seized shut. I bought a like for like replacement initially and this highlighted the limitation here. The bottle is so small and the regulators so poor that the gas flow actually changes during use and rapidly empties entirely. They have no gauge and so the first you know of having no gas is when your welds go horrible. I looked into it and found a good solution – you can buy regulators that adapt a normal gas bottle to this type of hard line.

I looked into getting gas and found that the time of massive rents on bottles is over. In the UK there are a couple networks of suppliers who will give you weld gas with only a bottle deposit (currently £65 for mine) and no ongoing rental charge. Once the bottle is empty you take the bottle back and get a full one and just pay the gas fill cost (about £30 for the bottle I have) I found a supplier of Hobbyweld gas (Noz-Alls Cheltenham – www.weldingdirect.co.uk) and got their 10L bottle, these are pressurised to 137 Bar giving a total of 1370L of gas. This lasts drastically longer. The shop I went to also sold a standard regulator but with a crimped hose and a push fit to suit this welder off the shelf making this very easy for about £20.

Roll Drag

One other problem I had was the tension spring which is supposed to hold the roll under a little tension to prevent overrunning was actually sharp and biting into the reel. I added a large flat washer under the spring to stop this then added a small washer as a shim to prevent it being over-tightened. This provides friction over a large area to avoid this problem and it seems to work well.

So once I’d done all of this it worked significantly better and we used it for a few projects to good effect right up until we tried to repair and refit the load bed of a pickup truck which involved welding plates onto chassis rails and various other extensive welding work. After burning through multiple contact tips and a couple shrouds we got to the point where the torch died entirely with the wire welding into the inner workings of it and came to the conclusion it was done for. The torch on these being hard wired into the unit finding a replacement wasn’t as simple as a standard euro torch and at this point I wasn’t sure it was worth replacing until we actually needed it again. Some time later I bought a new compact R-Tech MIG which by comparison is a revelation and so the old Migmate got thrown into a cupboard for storage with the expectation it would eventually probably be scrapped.

Though that’s not exactly how the story ends…

How to Set up Hikvision Network Cameras

Recently one of my neighbours told me there had been an incident where someone was seen trying van doors along the street late at night and combined with the habit of numerous people attempting to turn their cars round on my driveway with seemingly no ability to successfully do so or any apparent awareness of their surroundings I decided it was probably a good idea to get security cameras to keep an eye on the place!

I started looking into it and decided that network type cameras were the best idea because I already have a suitable server to store the footage and a long time ago started running substantial amounts of CAT5e cabling all over my house because due to having thick stone walls WiFi from a normal home router really wasn’t an option. Since I needed to install three separate wireless access points to cover all the indoor areas and so needed to run cable across the house anyway. With (at least some!) of the cable run in it sounded like the best solution.

At this point I should probably point out that I know nothing about what is the best camera, I can’t say for sure if what I bought were actually the best option but they seem pretty good so far but your mileage may vary.

So after a bit of searching I found that Hikvision cameras get good reviews and are generally quite well regarded so when a couple came up on eBay for a decent price I went for it. The model I bought was the DS-2CD2055FWD-I.

Hikvision DS-2CD2055FWD-I 5MP Camera

This is a 5MP camera which supports power over ethernet according to the 802.3AF standard but also come with a connector to allow the unit to be powered from a standard 12V wall adapter with a barrel plug. These cameras have an on board micro-SD card slot so can record both internally and to a network drive/DVR.

Because I didn’t have proper POE set up I decided to use a passive POE injector/splitter set from eBay, these are available for a couple of quid and allow power from a barrel connector power adapter to be merged with 100Mbit data onto a standard CAT5e cable. They have limitations but for low power over short distances they’re quite useful and let me keep the power supply safely inside.

Passive POE Injector

These aren’t weatherproof so I suggest if you’re using them tuck them somewhere sheltered or waterproof them. Or just buy a switch with proper POE support!

Ok so once you having network and power to the camera next you need to start configuring it. From a computer attached to the same network you need to install the Hikvision utility SADP which can be downloaded from here:

https://www.hikvision.com/en/Support/Downloads/Tools .

This will scan your network for active cameras and display them in a list. just click the check box on the camera you want to configure and enter a password – make a note of this password – you will need it to make further changes to the camera later on. Then you can set up the IP parameters for the camera. More details on this process can be found here:

SADP Manual

The rest of the camera configuration is generally as per how you want it for your specific use, the interesting bit comes when you try to get it to connect to a network drive as there seem to be a few issues.

Hikvision cameras don’t seem to have a good implementation of network drive access, the main problem being that if presented with a network drive of over a certain size (no-one seems to know what size but it is in the order of 100’s of gigabytes rather than terabytes) the camera fails the initialise the network drive. Creating a network folder with a quota doesn’t work either, windows devices will show the quota limit as the drive space but the Hikvision camera will still show the total volume size. We need to limit it in a more low level way!

The best solution I found under windows was to create a virtual hard disk in the machine you want to be the server. This is done by opening the windows disk management tool and selecting action -> create VHD then you just choose the appropriate size and where you want to save the virtual drive file. If you choose to create a fixed size a file of the full drive size will be created at the chosen location. I created a fixed size VHD of 200 Gb on my storage drive and this seemed to work well but a dynamic would probably work fine. The new drive will be shown in the drive list and should be initialised, right click on the new drive and initialise it as MBR. Do the same again but this time create a new simple volume of the full drive size and format it.

Once the new drive is created it will be shown in windows explorer and look just like any other drive. Next you need to share the drive over the network which in my case involved creating a second account on the server (or whatever PC you’re storing the data to) with limited access to do anything to the PC. Then the new drive is shared under this user account on the network. The username and password are needed to allow the camera to connect so make a note of these.

Next navigate a computer on the network to the IP address you configured for the camera and when prompted log in. Go to the configuration tab and under “advance configuration” select storage. and go to the “NAS” or possible “NET HDD” tab depending on version. Enter the IP address of the server and under file path enter the the network folder you shared earlier but prefix it with a forward slash. For example if you shared the drive under the network name Video then enter “/Video” without the quotes in the box. Mount type will usually be “SMB/CIFS” then username and password as you configured earlier for the user account on the drive.

Not shown in this picture is the “test” button next to the password, click test and hopefully you will get a message telling you testing succeeded.

Next you go across to the “Storage Management” (or possibly “HDD Management”) tab and with any luck the drive you just added will be listed. Click the check box and click format.

Once that completes it now has a network drive to write to!

Other points to note:

The camera will keep as much footage as it can in the space it has but will remove older footage once the space is full. You can have multiple destination drives but the camera will write the most recent data too all of them with the smaller spaces retaining less far back so you can have a camera with say a 16Gb SD card internally and a 200Gb network

5MP footage takes up a lot of storage space so I recommend creating a separate virtual drive for each camera if you spare the space!

You might notice if you use Chrome that you cannot get a preview from the camera – this is due to the camera using old plugins that are no longer compatible but if you search for a Chrome extension called IE Tab and install it adds a new button next to the address bar. Click the new button and go to the camera login again and you should find you get a preview!

There is a guide to get up Hikvision cameras on Synology NAS systems which might also be helpful for other network shares : https://us.hikvision.com/sites/default/files/tb/quick_start_guide_of_hikvision_ip_camera_synology_nas_connection_v1.1_0.pdf

Living with a Scirocco 1.4 TSI 160 (118kW)

So recently I finally decided it was time to retire my previous long suffering car – a 2003 1.4L Mk1 Seat Leon I’ve had for 10 years! When I bought the car in 2009 it had 62,000 miles on the clock, now it has 198,000 miles on it and needs to be run on 10W40 rather than the specified 5W30 just to stop the engine rattling. The Seat did well but it had a hard life including 3 years commuting 400 miles a week and had got to the point where I was fully expecting it to fail sooner or later and wanted something that wasn’t as underpowered.

So I started looking about for another car and the new style Scirocco caught my eye. After looking for a while I found a decent condition version with reasonable mileage, service history and not reaching a high bid. Detail on this car was a little lacking as it was just described as a 1.4 TSI but the car had no engine/spec badges (a factory option from VW) so I wasn’t sure which version it actually was but on the basis it wasn’t advertised as the higher power option it would be the lower power turbo only 122 bhp model. So I went for it and got it for a decent price. When I arrived to collect it having never actually seen it before I checked it and found the identifying sticker in the boot which showed the power as 118kW, this is 160bhp so I’d got the more powerful one.

Image of a 2010 Scirocco
Something like this one.

This is both a blessing and a curse because while obviously it goes better the 160bhp version also have a reputation for unexpectedly experiencing catastrophic engine failure.

That said always take forum posts on the internet with a pinch of salt – people rarely take to the internet as much when their car works perfectly.

By this point its too late to back out so I’m now the owner of a Scirocco with a 1.4L engine! So now I start looking into things I need to watch out for. The engine is the first interesting thing here as it’s both supercharged and turbocharged to give a much better low down grunt than expected from such a small engine with supercharger boost while still having a wider power curve by the turbo taking over at about 3000 rpm and working higher up. The engine peaks out at about 1.5 Bar of boost (22 PSI) from the factory. This system obviously adds complexity and potential points of failure with various valves and clutches to make it all work so a number of things to keep an eye on.

VW Technical guide to this engine available here

Clearly we’re playing with a fairly highly strung engine so my first thought is what the maintenance schedule on these was like. People tend to ignore their cars so long as they keep working and from my previous 1.4 VW engine in my Seat I’m aware they have some issues with oil consumption. On my first look at some of the reports of damage online most seemed to mention failures that could easily be a result of oil starvation. Again, something to keep an eye on.

Moving beyond the engine that car itself is fairly advanced as well. These cars come as standard with adaptive suspension designed to react to road conditions. It has four sports seats which are very comfortable and the boot is quite reasonable for this type of car. Internally the Scirocco is very similar (depending on model year) to either a mark 5 or mark 6 Golf but is a bit less practical due to the style of the vehicle and lower roof line. That said I’ve had four full grown adults in mine and while it’s not hugely roomy it’s comfortable enough.

Now for the the but – I think mine was cheap partly because it has none of the extras. It doesn’t have cruise control, it doesn’t have HID headlights, it doesn’t have the more common 18″ ‘turbine’ wheels (I have the 17″ shown above), no DAB radio and no bluetooth. Other than the twincharged engine its a basic model and for most people that would be all there is to it but that’s not how I work. I will improve it as I go along and hopefully record how I do it all on here!